Smaller is great, but where’s the social?

This week, Canon expanded its Rebel DSLR line to a new, smaller camera: the Canon EOS Rebel SL1. The SL1 manages to fit the majority of the larger Rebel T4i’s specs into a smaller and more portable device. This latest mini DSLR along with mirrorless cameras, that provide DSLR-quality and control without the bulk, are making it easier for consumers to access near-professional image quality.

Canon Rebel SL1

However, most camera brands are missing one key aspect in their entry-level DSLR cameras: social. The SL1 comes fully equipped with filters and in-device cropping, but where are the built-in Instagram or Flickr apps? Shouldn’t one of these cameras come with a  version of Android and it’s own app marketplace by now? There are already point-and-shoots that are android powered, and if these companies really want their professional cameras to appeal to consumers then their entry-level professional cameras need to start including more smart technology too.

Canon made a noble attempt at bringing smartphone capabilities to the Rebel T4i with its touchscreen – making the switch from point-and-shoot to DSLR a little less daunting, but it still lacks any other social aspects. Their latest releases, the SL1 and  T51, do nothing to advance in that field.

There are already apps for phones that give a DSLR look, and more phones like the Nokia Lumia are breaking all expectations with their strong photography performance. There’s really no reason for consumers to buy point-and-shoot cameras now – all of that functionality has been packed into the phones they carry around everywhere already.

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However, the DSLR offers something extra with the quality level and customizability – as long as manufacturers catch up to current social and tech standards. We live in the time of the visual revolution – where photos and social are two sides of the same coin, and DSLRs need to adapt before they become redundant.

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